Anyone else here into BBQ'ing?

Discussion in 'Healthy Eating & Nutrition' started by Enkidu, Jun 24, 2012.

  1. Blade Maker

    Blade Maker Master

    And it won't be ready till tomorrow...
     
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  2. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Damn, I love venison. I would love to get my hands on some to give it a go in the Weber.

    Right now, I've hit the "stall" on both butts, so they have been foiled with a cup of apple juice each. I also opened the vents up to get the temp up some while the butts are in foil. I've been Q'ing in the range of 250 F, but I'll probably get the temp up to about 300 or so for the next few hours. I'll start probing with the meat temp every hour on the hour. When the internal temp hits about 190 or so, I'll start checking for tenderness every 30 minutes or so. When we get to that point, I'll unwrap from the foil to crisp up the bark for about 30-40 minutes, then it is time to re-wrap the butts and let them rest, wrapped in towels, in a small cooler, for about 30-60 minutes.

    Then it is time to pull that pork, and start chowing down! Got my whole wheat buns, coleslaw, pickles, potatoes, and condiments ready to go!
     
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  3. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Heh... I did a 15 lb. whole packer brisket for Father's day. Started on Saturday night at about 9 p.m., got done with everything by about 8 p.m. Sunday night.

    Damn was it delicious tho!
     
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  4. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Alright, here is the deal with ribs.

    First and foremost is removing the membrane. That is film-like connective tissue that covers the inside of the ribs. You can use a clean flat-head screwdriver to wedge underneath the membrane, grab it with a paper towel, then tear it off. It might take a few tries, but you'll get it.

    Next is cleaning and drying off the ribs. Just rinse with water and pat dry with a paper towel. Now you want to rub the ribs down with a light coating of oil. I like extra virgin olive oil, but you can use what you prefer. Some people use either brown mustard or yellow mustard as a base for the rub to stick to instead (I've done this too and it works well). Next comes the dry rub. There are plenty of different dry rub recipes on the Internet and in books, etc. Just pick one and go for it. It doesn't have to be fancy or anything. Brown sugar, paprika, salt, pepper, and garlic, mustard powder or onion powder (or all three if you want) is a good start. I'll leave the type of sauce or mop (or lack of a sauce or mop) up to your taste and whatever recipe you find. You don't need a mop or sauce (that is Memphis style). If you have the time, you should then wrap the ribs in plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge for a few hours or, if you have time, up to overnight. If you don't have the time, you don't have to do this.

    Next is getting your grill up to temperature. True BBQ means low temperature and slowly cooked. The temp is usually between roughly 225 degrees to 275 degrees. Times vary based on what you are cooking, but with something like babybacks, 4 hours is about right. I usually prefer to Q ribs at about 225-250. Once you get the temp right, all you need to do now is throw the ribs on, throw some soaked hardwood chips over the coals (or make a smoker pouch out of tinfoil for gas) and close the lid. Replace the wood chips every 30-60 minutes (basically once it stops smoking) until you've applied smoke about 3-4 times. At that point, your ribs will probably have absorbed all the smoke they can.

    After about 3 hours at 225, it is time to take the baby backs out, wrap them in foil with a slather of butter, some brown sugar, and a bit of apple juice. Put them back on the grill, wrapped in foil and Q for about another hour or so. Then it is time to remove them from the foil, crisp the "bark" up some (perhaps 15-20 minutes on each side). You need to learn to do the "bend" and "pull" test to check for doneness. It might take a little longer, or a little less time. Once your ribs have passed the bend and pull test, remove them from the grill, wrap them in foil and let them "rest" for about an hour. During that hour, they will get more tender and reabsorb more juices. By the way, when you are firming up the bark, that is generally when you put your final application of sauce or mop on so that it will caramelize under the heat.

    These are some of the basics. There is a lot of room for variation and additional ways to make tweaks. Some will Q at closer to 275-300 even. Some don't wrap. Etc. But the most important thing is temperature control and patience.

    Here is a good resource for you:

    amazingribs.com (they do a lot more than ribs there).

    Lot's of good info there, including how to get real BBQ off of a gas grill or a basic kettle grill (which is what I am using to Q my two pork shoulders).
     
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  5. shotogaz

    shotogaz Disciple

    Hell fire Enkidu! your a Black Belt in BBQ!!! take me as your student master?
     
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  6. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    LOL!

    You must first prove your worth by cleaning my grill!

    BTW, here are the two butts right before I pulled them off about 30 minutes ago, foiled them, and put them in a cooler to rest for an hour to an hour and half:

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Deborah

    Deborah Ninja

    Hahahaaaa gaz good one....respects and smiles my martial friend
     
  8. Deborah

    Deborah Ninja

    Holy moly Endiku this is total BBQ porn!! Oooops, sorry if I offended anyone. Endiku I would like to serve under you also, I am already a BBQ cleaning Master. Sorry Gaz, but the female card comes out once more and I will say ladies before gentlemen!! Respects, drools and tummy rumbles XXxxXX
     
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  9. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

  10. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    BTW, despite what you may think, as long as you aren't loading your BBQ up with a ton of sugary BBQ sauces (and good BBQ doesn't need a sauce), BBQ can be part of a pretty healthy diet, particularly if you are eating a Paleo-type diet.
     
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  11. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    BTW, you can make a ceramic electric smoker yourself for about $80. My best friend lives in an apartment that doesn't allow charcoal and we went to home depot and target and got all the stuff we needed and built it. Do a google search for "Alton Brown Homemade Smoker". My buddy made an amazing pulled pork with his.
     
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  12. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Last Thanksgiving I made smoked beer can turkey with a can of Fosters!
     
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  13. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Who needs sunshine to grill or BBQ? Even when it rains in Los Angeles (rare to be sure), I still am outside Q'ing!
     
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  14. Mario Paul

    Mario Paul Samurai

     
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  15. Mario Paul

    Mario Paul Samurai

    Love cooking on my kettle BBQ
     
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  16. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Yeah, the kettle is really versatile -- you don't need a dedicated smoker to get top notch BBQ. Once you figure out the vents you can go low n' slow. I create a fire chamber by blocking off about 1/4 of my charcoal grate with two fire bricks. The other 3/4 is covered with tinfoil, then I put a drip pan on top of that. In the fire chamber, I'll put in about 2/3 a chimney starter's worth of unlit coals (probably about 40 or so) and wood chips. Then I put about 10 lit coals on top of them. When I put the cooking grate on, I put a water pan above the coals (which you can see in the photos). My bottom and top vents are closed about 2/3 of the way (with the top vent being opposite from the coals so the smoke gets pulled across the food). This method works well for me, and I can keep temps as 225 for a long time if I want without adding more coals (although you do have to keep adding water to the water pan). If I want to up the temp some, I just open the vents a bit more. I can maintain 250 and 275 with different vent positions and still have the coals burning for a long time with very little need to add additional coals.

    Now, with that said, one of these days I would LOVE to get a Large Green Egg ceramic smoker...
     
  17. Kevin

    Kevin Admin Staff Member

    My mouth is watering just looking at the pics in this thread.

    I love going to BBQ's but I'm certainly a novice when it comes to doing it myself.int Hopefully that will change as my garden will be finished soon. My decking has been finished so now he just has to finish the garden. He's building a bbq area into the side of the shed. Will probably just buy a cheap gas bbq. Can't wait to sit out there with a few beers. Just need good weather now :)
     
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  18. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Kevin,

    A good kettle BBQ is cheaper than a gas BBQ and infinitely more adaptable. True, a charcoal grill takes a little more time to get going (getting the coals going and all). Yes, I also have a 4 burner gas grill (usually used for grilling things that are relatively short duration and that I don't want to add smoke flavor to), but all of my BBQ'ing and the vast majority of my grilling are done on the kettle grill.

    I think my 22.5" One-Touch Gold Weber grill ran roughly $120 or so. You can get a smaller size and one with less bells and whistles for a lot less (like $50 or even less). By way of comparison, my 4-burner Brinkman gas grill (which is a lower end gas grill) goes for about $220 or so. Then there is the cost of propane versus charcoal to factor in. This isn't to say that you cannot get great food from a gas grill, or even be able to do true BBQ on them, it is just a lot harder and takes more work and knowledge to accomplish.

    A good Weber kettle grill can do everything. I like the "Gold" series because it has an ash-catcher and a hinged grill grate so I can add more charcoal without removing the grill. About the only others thing you need are a cheap chimney starter to get the coals going (NEVER use lighter fluid unless you want your food to taste like it), long-handled tongs and spatulas, and heavy mitts.
     
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  19. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Some photos from yesterday's spare rib cook:

    Here are the ribs right after I removed the membrane from the back. You have to remove that membrane if you want delicious succulent ribs, in my opinion. It only takes a few extra minutes of work and is well worth it.

    [​IMG]

    3 racks of ribs coated with a rub. I only had enough rub left over from last weekend's pork shoulder for two of the ribs. So I made another rub up on the spot for the 3rd spare rib. I wrapped them in plastic wrap and put in the fridge for about an hour.

    [​IMG]

    This is my grill set up for smoking. About 40 unlit coals blocked off by two fire bricks. A foil wall between the bricks and the drip pan. Aluminum foil under the drip pan. A drip pan with water under where the ribs will be placed. A second water pan was added on top of the coals on the cooking grate, opposite the ribs. To start the fire, I add soaked wood chips and about 10 lit coals on top of the 40 unlit coals.

    [​IMG]

    Staging the ribs prior to putting them on while the grill temperature rises. I put them on at 200 and let the temperature go up to about 225. Later I opened some vents and let the temperature ride up to 250. I don't normally use a rib rack, but I can only fit two ribs into my Weber if I don't use a rack.

    [​IMG]

    Right after putting the ribs on. You cannot see the smoke coming out on this photo, but it is coming out a VERY light blue. At this level of smoke, things are perfect and the smoke is not carcinogenic.

    [​IMG]

    About an hour into the cook. Notice the foil heat shield on the rib rack. That protects against direct radiant heat from the coals so that the ribs cook evenly. That said, I still rotated the ribs just to be sure.

    [​IMG]

    Just prior to foiling. This was about 3.5 hours into the cook.

    [​IMG]

    Right after removal from the foil, maybe 5 hours into the cook total. Crisping up the bark by rotating the ribs directly over the coals after applying a sauce. This took about 45 minutes.

    [​IMG]

    After taking it off the grill. I love the look of that glistening bark... Total cook time roughly 6 hours or so.

    [​IMG]

    Hard to see the smoke ring in this photo, but it is there, a light pink that goes almost all the way to the bone:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Kevin

    Kevin Admin Staff Member

    That looks amazing. 6 hours - I'm usually half drunk and in bed by that time haha.

    I might look into the kettle BBQ. My brother got a gas one and when talking to him about it recently he said that charcoal ones are probably better. I'll probably decide over the next few weeks. Both types are fairly cheap to buy so I could always switch later if I wasn't happy. I was keen on the gas one from a less smoke point of view, plus you don't have to wait....though I guess that's half the fun!
     

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