Defence against high kicks

Discussion in 'Self Defense' started by WonderingFist, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. WonderingFist

    WonderingFist Disciple of Mind

    Kicks to the face, throat or shoulder, whether crescent, side, roundhouse or axe; how do you combat them, defend against them or otherwise survive them?

    Yes they're impractical in real-world application, but they do happen.
    They also tend to occur a lot in tournaments and 1-on-1 sparring.
    I don't do tournaments, and most of the people I've sparred never pulled them.

    But I'm curious, and this is a martial forum. DISCUSS!
     
    Deborah likes this.
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  3. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    I have only run into kicks like that tournament fighting. I have never had anyone go for a kick (other than the n*ts) in a street fight. I usually us bobbing, weaving, and 45 degree foot work to counter ... either that or just simply duck.
     
    Aaron likes this.
  4. WonderingFist

    WonderingFist Disciple of Mind


    mm...Kinda like that.
     
  5. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Footwork.
     
  6. WonderingFist

    WonderingFist Disciple of Mind

    Elaborate, please?
     
  7. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Footwork and head movement. I'm always moving in, sometimes on someone's centerline sometimes not, to combine my boxing, elbows, and knees with my grappling. So any high kick attempts are typically jammed up or avoided altogether. Low kicks can sometimes jam me up or break my flow briefly but high kicks do not.
     
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  8. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    I tend to move in a "v" with a lot of lateral movement. I don't move in a straight line towards my opponent. This is a common error that a lot of martial artists make. Defense against strikes, leg, knee, elbow, or hand, starts first with not being in a position where you are easy to hit. That means moving back out of range, or moving out of the line of the attack, or, as RJ mentioned, rapidly closing the distance and jamming the kick. The goal is to keep your opponent off balance with your footwork and launch your attacks from a position of balance.

    I remember back in college I was in the martial arts room in the college gym and there were 3 guys doing martial arts sparring on the mat. I knew almost nothing about kicks and such. I knew boxing and wrestling (and was in there hitting the heavy bag). One of the guys asked me if I wanted to spar with them. They explained their rules, which was basically some sort of primitive MMA rules (this was before the UFC existed). I sad "okay". My sparring with each one of them was pretty much the same thing every time:

    They would fly into a flurry of kicks and I would just circle and close, circle and close, without getting hit, land a series of boxing punches, then transition to a double leg take down and slam and then they would tap (I didn't know subs and neither did they, but none of them could wrestle worth a damn). Now, I cannot speak as to how good these guys were at their martial art, but they moved in a straight line and, despite my never training at defending kicks, I had no problem avoiding with footwork from boxing -- don't be a stationary target, move to a position where your lead foot splits your opponents' hips and his doesn't split yours. Make his strikes miss due to footwork or have no strength due to you having balance and your opponent not having balance.

    These things are basic in boxing. Footwork is the life's blood of boxing. I don't know of any other striking art that places as much emphasis on footwork as boxing does. And this is one of the reasons why boxers are so good (among others) and why many other striking arts will cross train in boxing.
     
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  9. Michael Spivey

    Michael Spivey Warrior Monk

    Defending against kicks regardless of what type they are depends of where they come from and how they are delivered, and it is real hard to "tell" someone how to do that in writing. Allowing the opponent to set the distance is a big mistake. As to kicks not working on boxers, it all depends on if you are trained to direct your kicks at the legs as a target. I have lost track of the number of boxers I have knocked down by kicking their legs and I have no issue with braking someones legs or knees in a fight. Fighting is not a sport to me it is and had been a way to stay alive and not in a hospital.

    There is a broad truism in that before one can know how to combat against something they must be familiar with that "thing" and how it is used or applied. This applies in many areas in ones life.
     
  10. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Low kicks are effective and harder for a boxer to avoid, however the subject matter of the thread was high kicks.
     
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  11. MadoreGojuRyu

    MadoreGojuRyu Master

    you can usually tell what kinda fighter you are up against within a few short moments, we all have our tells. if someone shows even a slight hint of being a kicker I set myself for a blitz and unload up close. if someone isnt as much of a threat as they like to think they are I will usually go for a sweep of some sort also.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Andy Homer

    Andy Homer Disciple

    We teach kickboxing for sport and self defence; from the sporting side of it we teach high kicks and also how to defend from them. As a previous post has pointed out if you give a kicker space he will use it to his advantage so closing him down is one way to defend from high kicks, we also teach how to evade kicks and worse case scenario to block them. We always tell our students to keep a high guard to protect the head to prevent getting knocked out and keep the elbows tucked to protect the ribs. Light sparring helps sharpen your reactions and should enable you to develop a strategy to defend from high kicks.
     
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  13. Deborah

    Deborah Ninja

    Ooooft Adam in my gym we use them all the time....although I wouldn't say impractical as such, having been knocked out several times in either sparring or fighting with a high kick to my face, head and neck:eek:!! As for effective counters, there are too many to list from JKD. But an even more effective defense is taken from Fillipino Boxing. The 'gung tings' from Kali are really effective and devastatingly crippling. One to counter a high Thai kick or say a high Forte(Savate kick), is to almost guide the kick is with one hand downwardly, and with your other hand you elbow the ankle as you guide the kick into your elbow....love, peace and respects my great martial warrior friend xxxXXXXxxxXXXX
     
  14. Deborah

    Deborah Ninja

    This is sooooooo true Endiku low kicks are harder to block as you cannot really see them coming....peace, respects and love my weight-lifting strong warrior friend XXXxxXXX
     
  15. shyquille graves

    shyquille graves Warrior Monk

    there are thai blocks that i have learned that could help you with high kicks and low kicks arent that hard to bloack especially if your a muay thai practioner becuase thats where alot of the kicks are targeted thats why you develop your shins and leg muscles so when you do get kicked its less pain a few nice shin blacks i bet that person throwing kicks will think twice thats when you have them beat
     
  16. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    watching the kick land (at full speed) reminds me of this guy who just doesn't get out of the way either;)
     
  17. Michael Spivey

    Michael Spivey Warrior Monk

    This is what is termed a Hop Side Kick. The rear foot and front foot position is exchanged by a "hop" and the lead foot kicks. It is very fast and if done correctly hard to counter, not impossible just hard.
     
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  18. Deborah

    Deborah Ninja

    We, in JKD call that a push-shuffle with a jumping side-kick Michael. I agree with you Michael, it isn't impossible to counter but when used with the technique of the push-shffle, this kick is devastating and a great rib breaker......love, peace and respects my martial warrior friend XXXXxxxXXX
     
  19. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    This isn't a shining example of that kick (very much telegraphed, but they are young yet). I've landed that type of kick often in sparring (I never play with high kicks in real fights), typically throwing a jab as a feint/eye draw and letting my rear foot be "pulled" and glide forward (not hop) into the kick. I only posted my vid tongue in cheek* to emphasize that he should add a bit of body movement to help himself out.
    *don't know how wide spread that saying is, those who don't know it means take it humorously and not at face value
     
  20. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

     
  21. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Lateral movement is your friend.

    The demonstrated technique might be hard to counter if you fight in a straight line like Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots. If you fight like that, then your only options are to move forward, move back, or be faster in getting your strike in. What is amazing is how easily the technique could have been defended had the guy who got hit been circling to his left, or at the very least not been flat-footed and squared up to his opponent. That is just awful footwork. I don't mean to be harsh on the guy, I am sure he is young and still learning, but I find a lot of TMA martial artists have some piss-poor footwork. They can throw amazingly fancy and flashy powerful kicks -- frankly, stuff I couldn't do because I don't kick -- but they do it while operating on a line with their opponent.

    What is amazing is how much you can tell when a TMA martial artist has spent some time learning footwork (or cross-training with a good boxing coach). Their footwork is a zillion times better than what you usually see from martial artists who haven't spent time learning footwork. Admittedly, the range in boxing is shorter than in an art that allows kicking, but the fundamentals of the footwork are the same and can applied to kicking arts once you adjust for the different range and additional weapons. Bobbing and weaving from boxing may not have equal application, but the footwork most certainly does.
     
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