judo vs jujitsu

Discussion in 'Judo' started by steve didino, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Overall, if you want to improve your grappling in leaps and bounds then pick either Judo or BJJ. Since only Judo is on your list of two choices I would recommend that.
    Preparedness everywhere can mean lack everywhere, and this slow learning curve due to the very diversity of training can at the very least leave your grappling lacking for quite some time. The focusing on their specific aspects of grappling for BJJ and Judo and having the opportunity to continually hone these against diverse opponents through sport application is what makes these arts very strong as well as applicable for self-defense. As far as less lethal techniques, nearly every technique can be deadly if that is the intent. I can slam someone on top of their head just as easily as I can allow them to rotate/flip into a safer landing position and even on a "safe" landing if you're driving the person into the ground on a full follow through on a throw they are done when they hit the ground. Judo dropping techniques that couldn't easily be tweaked to allow training partners to remain relatively safe allows them to train everything at full speed and often full power. And of course submissions are just joint locks and chokes that you don't always follow through with if sporty, but it's easy enough to finish (and that sometimes happens in sport as well).
    As for the most cited "issues" for Judo & BJJ of weapons and multiple opponents. Most supposedly full spectrum self defense arts can't dedicate enough time and/or don't train weapons realistically enough to truly have much of an edge vs weapons as any other martial artist, so we'll call that a tie. Multiple opponents may be a win for them if they are assessing what they're doing and making sure their training "looks real" and not like some action movie sequential opponents with telegraphed attacks scene, or don't basically assume that every technique they throw is going to be some wrecking ball body destroyer that "takes him out". Of course, we're covering the same ground that's been trampled on in past threads here...
     
  2. Aaron

    Aaron Shadow Warrior

    True... but by adopting the art for sport you things get stripped away and tend to get watered down.
    If learning curve I was making reference to the rank progression, I should have clarified that.
    I am not trying to do an art vs art thing. Just giving some info from what I have seen.
     
  3. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Grasshoppa



    actually the jujitsu i was meaning isnt bjj it was traditional japanese jutjitsu
     
  4. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Yes, that's why I picked Judo for you from your list of two. (y) I was discussing Judo & BJJ more as a counterpoint in reference to Aaron's post.
     
  5. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Grasshoppa


    ah right. i plan on doing bjj when in about 3 years or so as i would then be capable at my bas style which is tkd and also have good grappling in judo (which i will now go for) and then train in an mma gym. i actually plan to do all of the jujitsu like jjj, judo and bjj as jjj would be more street applications then sport applications like judo and bjj. probably start jjj when im done with fighting
     
  6. Battodoka07

    Battodoka07 Warrior Monk


    Doing JJJ, Judo and BJJ can make you a very well rounded martial artist. If you have a good striking art combined in like Kyokushin, Muay Thai, boxing, etc then that's even better. As for progression you just have to drill each aspect of free movement, clinch work and ground over and over again and you'll find you will go through JJJ much more quickly. Applying locks against resistance, which after you get proficient enough, CAN be done. It well also teach that working techniques against a resisting opponent is not a static environment but very dynamic. I had the same issue when I first started with my style. There was so much to learn I felt like I was all over the place and not as well versed as someone who begins just learning a single style (BJJ for example). Eventually I started spending a few hours just on ground technique, train clinch work and then do free movement sparring each with it's own separate hour and drill it each week to gain proficiency. Later I was able to bridge the gap and transition between each phase of fighting to make it seamless. Just make sure you find a good instructor who is well versed in all aspects and you'll become quite a scary person if you find yourself in a fight.
     
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  7. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Grasshoppa


    i do taekwondo as my striking art as much as i dont like calling it that lol
     
  8. Battodoka07

    Battodoka07 Warrior Monk


    I've known a few friends who did takewondo as their first or main art but their school shied away from the point sparring mindset and focused more on self defense. So when they started training at my dojo it wasn't as hard of a transition for fighting free movement (one of them also did a bit of boxing). When you blend styles like that, much like MMA you'll find which techniques best suit your fighting style, body type, etc. One reason why I love Bruce Lee as he really advocated that. Other folks here such as RJ also have this practical mindset regarding martial arts. JJJ has techniques in which an opponent would have a sword or tanto and or they would prevent you from drawing your own weapon. So when you first start out learn the technique from whatever position they have you defending from the attacker. It might not appear to be street oriented at first but you'll start to learn principles behind the techniques and learn body movement. If it's a good school once you get the basics down then they'll teach you have to blend locks with strikes and what to do when someone resists, what techniques and strikes flow together well, etc.

    Really it comes down to a matter of time and what you want to invest into your training. I was and still am a dojo rat. Even outside of class I was drilling and rolling with friends (who each have diverse backgrounds, and not all of they train at the same place as i do).

    Whatever you decide though don't hesitate to ask questions here and at the school you train at. Gambatte!
     
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  9. michael mckenna

    michael mckenna Grasshoppa



    thanks for the advice man
     
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  10. Battodoka07

    Battodoka07 Warrior Monk

    Anytime. :) Keep up your training!
     
  11. starprocombat1

    starprocombat1 Initiate

    In Judo, much of the emphasis is weighted on standing techniques versus ground techniques. On the other hand, Jiu Jitsu is heavily focused on ground techniques with some standing techniques in the form of self-defense
     

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