Muay Thai Clench: More of a Weakness?

Discussion in 'Striking Martial Arts' started by drewtoby, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. DeeD

    DeeD Nak Muay

    True it is used in a ring environment primarily but with slight variations can be used to great affect in the street environment, to get leverage to perform a strike, to sweep and to execute a standing choke off as well as mentioned earlier if needed, So in isolation yes ring environment but like everything when executed as part of a combination the application transcends that one isolated movement much like a isolated punch or kick
     
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  2. drewtoby

    drewtoby Disciple

    Yet another reason why Hapkido is not used in the ring. Take out our vital strikes, small joint manipulation, ect. and all we can do is jab/throw. But that does not mean I can't loose to a ring fighter, I am darn sure I would.

    And I really need to pay attention to where these arts came from, thanks for the correction. I agree that Muay Thai would be as good as any other MA in the street. Don't most people instinctively grab the clincher's arms?

    Reason why I am not saying great is from the unknowns, such as weapons. Any trained MA can fall to a lucky blow or weapon strike.
     
  3. DeeD

    DeeD Nak Muay

    A lot of people just mimic what you are doing so if u clinch around the neck they try hold you by the neck, Same as an inexperienced striker if you throw a headkick the next strike they throw will be the same, funny that it works like that.

    Agreed yes weapons etc are a different thing completely
     
  4. drewtoby

    drewtoby Disciple

    Copying a clincher would be the worst thing to do... ouch! No guard = free ride in an ambulance.

    What kicks do you guys do? Any above the waist?
     
  5. DeeD

    DeeD Nak Muay

    :blackeye:

    definitely we can kick wherever we want, high low up to us

    All kicks really - roundhouse,back kick,side kick, front kick(teep) axe kick, spinning kicks)heel etc) hook kicks, anything really we train in all of them, traditionally the most common are roundhouse and front push kicks but I like to mix it up. teep to the face followed by heavy jab cross, one of my fav combos, also because of the shin conditioning we do we are generally less hesitant when throwing kicks because we aren't to worried about catching bone, so often i deliberately roundhouse kick a guys shin when I know my conditioning is better than his to make him hesitant to try and block with that leg again



     
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  6. Sneaker

    Sneaker Warrior Monk

    Poor Banana tree ... you know banana tree does not hit back ?
     
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  7. Sneaker

    Sneaker Warrior Monk

    I don't know which one you apply on ... streetfight or fight with rules ?
    For streetfight : Let's make some patty cakes (smash the groins) and rip it out
     
  8. drewtoby

    drewtoby Disciple

    Nice! I am working on some high kicks by myself: Hapkido stays at or below your belt. But hey, if I can kick someone's head, why not?
     
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  9. DeeD

    DeeD Nak Muay

    Thats Baukaw has 242 professional fights, guy is more versed in fighting than most guys will ever be

    well you cant use the chokes in a muay thai traditional fight, could be used in a mma fight or could transition well for street fight within a combination
     
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  10. Eric Dufurrena

    Eric Dufurrena The Iron Fist of Fun

    Have you ever kicked one? I assure you, they do hit back...
     
  11. Eric Dufurrena

    Eric Dufurrena The Iron Fist of Fun

    Quick note, first off fighting is not everything, even though these are fighting arts. If you love your art, you don't need to explain to yourself or anyone else why you practice it. If you are interested in expanding your self defense ability, that is fine too. People may say Hapkido is 'ineffective' vs other arts, but two of Hapkido's strengths lie in usability in a self defense (not quite fighting) scenario against an untrained assailant (which is what you will likely be attacked by, not a ring fighter) and its surprise factor. I enjoyed Hapkido very much. Except perhaps when we did demos, and my instructor would throw me 10 times in a row without letting go of my wrist. Onto hard floor. And he didn't like to bend over much, either.:dead:
     
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  12. DeeD

    DeeD Nak Muay

    Me too feel like a rag doll with my Sabubnim
     
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  13. drewtoby

    drewtoby Disciple

    True. Hapkido also seems to work good when defending against experienced strikers as well. Not fighting, as the striker would win 9/10 times, if not 10/10. Defending, with no rules and the environment at our disposal. Makeshift weapons can make/break a defensive encounter as well (a lot of our defensive forms translate well into this). As for people stating its ineffective, they need to go to visit a real Hapkido school. I have yet to exchange techniques with a ground fighter, but I am sure that some of my last school's ground fighting techniques will help :)

    I know I don't have to explain myself. I just get annoyed with haters claims sometimes :shifty: .
     
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  14. Kuyaken

    Kuyaken Karate for the streets not just for trophies

    May I ask, as this question is about Muay Thai a Ring Sport (although many useful techniques in real life scenarios) and Hapkido anAlround style which I've not seen used in competition.

    Can anyone advise of Successful Hapkido Fighters who regularily compete in MMA Cage or Ring events where it is tested against other proficient professional fighters as this thread is a little of a comparison of the 2 arts so wanted to see what examples one could add of MMA Cage fights where the victor is exclusively Hapkido.

    I once asked about training at a Hapkido Dojang it was 89 miles away and I was told I was not allowed to train in any other art.
     
  15. drewtoby

    drewtoby Disciple

    that dojang sounds fishy. a lot of hkd practitioners cross train and my teachers have all cross trained as well. most commonly people choose to start tkd and then cross train hapkido. both my teachers did as well as a high % of students. hkd is not as popular for one, and second its hard to find a good dojo.

    you will not really see a true hkd fighter in the ring. the rules limit what we can do, so we need to supplement our loss of vital strikes, joint manipulation, ect. with stronger ground work and more striking. we have kicking/sweeping but after rules we can only jab solar plexus for striking. but there are some hkd mma schools, as well as a couple fighters that have dabbled in hkd. our sweeps and kicks work well ;)
     
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