TKD power training

Discussion in 'Strength Training' started by Sherratt, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    Im aware they use weights in most karate styles to develop power but i was wondering what some good weight drills using a dungbell were to improve my power in ITF TKD? it dosent bother me if the drills are from karate since its very similar in the first place
     
    Master of Nothing likes this.
  2.  
  3. Judah

    Judah fights in tights

  4. Master of Nothing

    Master of Nothing Psychotic Pacifist

    Actually any that karateka practice should help. As TKD came from MDK. And don't let the koreans hear you repeat this but, MooDukKwan has heavy Shotokan influence. The japanese occupied korea for like 60 somthing years. This was bond to happen.

    I like dumbells and the bench. I like many hold weights while punching. From the standing position the weight pull down on your fists. That helps in "lifting" the punch the most and a little assist on forward thrust. Using the bench allows you to have direct resistance against you technique. Makes you hit faster, deeper, and harder. I'll also hold a curling bar with light weight with my forearms. I think "Bruce" did something like this. Improves blocking power and hardness. Also a standing ab stretch with weights to help tone abs. Its like stand straight then bending back like starting a backbridge (albeit not that far). Balance drills with the elevated foot supporting that weight. Anything that hardens the core.
    Caution: As you already know too much muscle mass can slow you down. So, High Reps with different changes in speed of execution.
     
  5. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    What equipment do you have? Just dumbbells, or do you have other stuff? Do you have dumbbells you can adjust the weight on, or just one specific set weight? There are many terrific exercises you can do but for some using too much weight puts you at risk for injury. Then there are other exercises that are almost pointless with too little weight. In every exercise you want poundages that will be challenging but safe - maintaining good form throughout. For a hard striking art building explosive strength would correlate into your striking ability. So a mix of powerlifting, olympic lifts, strongman-type lifts, and plyometrics would be ideal additions to your workouts. Once we have an idea what gear you have it'll be easier to suggest specific movements.
     
  6. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    only equipment i have is a 5 kg dumbbell (as far as im aware its a set weight, but for the moment its a good weight for me) since my brother is using the other one in the set, a pair of 500g ankle weights im borrowing from my instructor and myself
     
  7. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    If my conversions are correct the dumbbell is around 11 lbs, and the ankle weights sound more like light wrist weights at around a pound each. If you can get them to cinch tight we'll mostly use the ankle weights on your wrists. Shadowboxing with just the wrist weights is good, without snapping to full extension (keep at least a slight bend in the elbows). You can also cycle in the dumbbell in one hand during the shadowboxing and switch when one arm/shoulder really feels the "burn".

    You can also do modified burn-outs (I usually do them on a cable crossover) with the dumbbell in hand throw as many straight punches as you can while returning the hand to the guard position each time, and keep those hands up at or above shoulder height! When that becomes too hard switch to uppercuts (keeping the other hand up in guard position) you can run this for a set time period, like a two or three minute round. If you're not "on fire" at the end of the round you need to pick up the pace.

    A straight lifting circuit you can do with just one dumbbell is bent over lateral raises (rear delt & a little lat), into standing lateral raises (side or middle of delt), front raises, one arm upright rows, shoulder pressses, then lying down and bench pressing the weight. These are all done back to back with no rest (do a set amount or until you feel a burn). This order is essentially chosen for the hardest exercise to the easiest, so the hardest is done while you're the freshest/strongest, but the fatigue from each one before it makes every one seem almost equally hard. Using one dumbbell really engages the stabilizer muscles as well. You can look up kettlebell exercises and follow their routines using your single dumbbell.

    A great total body plyometric exercise are thunder roll burpees. Hold either end of the dumbbell in front of you at waist level. Sit down into a rear breakfall, rolling back then roll forward forcefully using the weight to add "oomph", stand up and explode into a jump, bend over and place weight on floor, kick your feet back into a push-up position and do a diamond-type push-up on the dumbbell, bring your feet back in to the dumbbell, grab it at both ends and stand up into the starting position. That's one rep.

    That's a good amount of stuff to start with. This plus what anyone else suggests should give you a nice variety of things to do with your limited equipment. Of course cycle in whatever calisthenics you want to add intensity to the workouts.
     
  8. Dave76

    Dave76 Deheuol Gwyn Dragon

    If you can't do 100 push ups with ease then start cracking, working you way uo to explosive push ups or clapping push ups if you prefer, finally working your way up to alternating single arm push ups.
    It's a little old school I know, but it's also tried and true.
     
  9. Master of Nothing

    Master of Nothing Psychotic Pacifist

    Have you thoughtabout weightvests? I use an old one (only 40lbs). Added with two 20 lbs of the legs (I tie them up hight to reduce knee stress) and two 10lbs weight for the arms. So altogether its only 100 extra pounds on me. Which isn't that much considering the distribution of weight. Weighted routine can include power walking (I onlyrun when chased), Forms & Basics, Striking mechanics (Nothing too fast), some calisthetics (when the weights aren't in the way), and Household cores (cleaning, mowing, etc.). After a couple years I can wear the weight with little notice for the first few hours. Then it starts to slow me down. I used to love wearing them up to about 15 to 20min before sparring. The gap time allowing my body to adjust for the lack of resistance. When I'm not a sloth, I have to 10lbs kettle weights I'll add to the routine. Then its farkin naptime.
     
    RJ Clark likes this.
  10. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Good post, but this is my fav part!:ROFLMAO:
     
    Master of Nothing likes this.
  11. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    sadly im kind of short on cash at the moment :( since im starting a course soon so im reserving money for that. also started doing hindu squats which are great
     
    Master of Nothing likes this.
  12. Master of Nothing

    Master of Nothing Psychotic Pacifist

    ? Hindu squats? Sounds cool. Please elaborate.
     
  13. Judah

    Judah fights in tights

    To perform a Hindu squat, you stand with your hands pulled into your chest. As you lower yourself to squat, extend your hands behind you (downward toward the floor). As you approach the bottom of your squat, raise up on your toes. Propel yourself upward, at the same time extending your arms in front of you. Bring your hands in toward your chest and begin a second rep.

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1345830306.202291.jpg

    Hindu Squat or Bethak used by Indian wrestlers for centuries. :)
     

Share This Page