When not to tell people you are a Black belt

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Discussions' started by Papajay, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. Papajay

    Papajay Disciple

    Is it me or has this happened to any of you? On a night out or just in the street to inform someone you are a black belt and you don't want any bother, seems to be an invitation for them to throw the first punch or to start taunting you? I have taken to saying im "martial arts trained" instead. Because every time i have mentioned having a black belt i have had to fight my way out!!!
     
    arron butler and Ben like this.
  2. WonderingFist

    WonderingFist Disciple of Mind

    That's because to many, 'black belt' is an invitation.
    'Black Belt' is not a threat. 'Black Belt' is not a warning. It's a challenge.
    Most of the time, even saying "I know martial arts..." is a challenge.
    It's not of my personal opinion, but that's what I've seen, that's what I've experienced, that's what my friends tell me about, and that's what I'm told. Seems right to me.
     
  3. I dont tell people what rank i am, i do find that some people become upset that i wont tell them (like its public knollege), though as 'Wandering Fist' said, i have said in a passing conversations with people that i practice martial arts. Males especially seem to think they need chalenge me, prove themselves even more so when i was out with a group. Espcially if the group majority are women. I find this such strange behaviour but it happens, my Wife even commented on it when we were out with some of her friends one time. I have been lucky none of these situations got physical.
    I prefer not to tell anyone that i do martial arts, untill i have vetted them first. If people ask, i deflect the question that i do weights in the gym, which is true, so im not lying. I find its easyier, safer and if they do decide to get grumpy and physical ; i will have surprise and advantage in defending my self.
     
    arron butler likes this.
  4. Gone

    Gone Guest

    Those kind of people are itching to prove how BOOSHEIT your martial arts training is. So, they (think) they will enjoy picking you apart. Most people do not put stock in martial arts training for self defense because they believe real fights on the street aren't like those in a gym, or that too many things can happen in public. Whatever.
     
  5. shyquille graves

    shyquille graves Warrior Monk

    i live in a place where i dont have to warn people what i do or what training i have i get along with people prettyy much but really if i do have a problem i dont warn people because they started it its not your fault they just started something they couldnt finish next time they will know not to mess with everyone they see
     
    arron butler and SifuPhil like this.
  6. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    I use a different way to get out of potential altercations. Usually if it has escalated to a point where one might tell someone about their training, you are at a tipping point anyways where you are trying to posture to make your opponent back down in the hopes of avoiding the fight. Basically what you are telling someone when you say that is "I can beat you up, so you better think twice about going through with this." But the problem is, the way you are saying it isn't particularly menacing, or at least menacing enough to make the other person back down.

    Although it has been a while since I've had to do so, one of my favorite things to say to people who were looking to start trouble was to smile at them, have an air of casual confidence... almost cockiness to you and say something like, "hey, you know how you picture this thing going right now... yeah, it is about to go the complete opposite of that." I find grinning and saying something a bit menacing with cold blood to be a far better intimidation tactic than "I'm a black belt" or "I train martial arts."
     
    Judah, arron butler and SifuPhil like this.
  7. shyquille graves

    shyquille graves Warrior Monk

    ive run into a few people that were like that too until i proved theem wrong but i rerally cant stand people like that i jst stop talking to them because they ar ignorant and if you were to actually get into a physical situation with them and hurt them its your fault because you are supposed to be more disicipline then them and with mma on the rise i suspect that more situation like this will get more frequent
     
    steve didino likes this.
  8. Soulpatch

    Soulpatch Initiate

    I would never tell anyone where I rank, unless I am with a group of close friends and usually know anyway. And, I would never warn anyone that they are getting ready to have a can of whoop ass opened on them. They are going to either find out the hard way or not at all.
     
  9. shyquille graves

    shyquille graves Warrior Monk

    i like your style
     
  10. Papajay

    Papajay Disciple

    Where i live in the U.K. i was always lead to believe that by law you had to inform an potential attacker when possible of you martial arts training before using it on him! This may not be 100% accurate but its what we were told!
     
  11. David

    David Initiate

    Lets change the question a little, "In a confrontation, do you tell people that you are a black belt to scare someone away, or to make yourself feel better?" In my experience, there is no reason to tell anyone on the street, especially in a confrontation, that I have any advanced skills. First, training in martial arts should give me the awareness and the humility to keep me out of these situations, but in the rare instance that I may not have any choice in the matter, I would never want to take any advantage away. I was in Chicago once with an ex and she inadvertently bumped into a patron outside of a club. I was "challenged" by this "highly trained martial artist", with language that I hadn't heard since my military days. Anyway, this nice gentleman even assumed a martial arts posture to let me know he had some training. But in my opinion he was all ego and scared and he was doing this to make himself feel better and hoping to scare me. It seemed that he was used to people "responding" a certain way when he assumed kamae. I took my ex's hand and guided her behind me and just stood there and watched him. After about 15 seconds he said something like, "your not worth wasting my skills on" and walked into the club. In society today, announcing advanced skills are an invitation, we are a more violent culture, and more than 50% of the young people today are multiple tour, combat veterans. If I tell someone my rank, (oooo I'm a black belt), they may throw a punch just to see what all the fuss is about, or they may just pull out a knife or a gun to "even things out"...
     
  12. Curt Walker

    Curt Walker Initiate

    I no longer tell people what grade i am or even that i practice martial arts at all,
    On the few occassions i have said anything regards my training it has always ended with fist's flying,
    where as when i have said nothing about it i have been able to talk my self out of most situations.
     
  13. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    Verbal and other intimidation tactics are a valid form of self defense, as far as I am concerned. You are less likely to have to fight if your potential opponent is somehow made aware that you know how to fight and are prepared to do so. How you relay that information is posturing. Some forms of posturing are more effective than others. Posturing can also include how you carry yourself, the look on your face, the degree of eye contact, and what you say (or don't say). The problem for the OP is that referencing your belt or your martial arts training is usually an invitation for this to go the other way.

    It rarely works, at least not in the way the OP did it. OTOH, a friend of mine who was a professional MMA fighter had a traffic altercation with a guy who got out of his car and approached. My friend used the "do you know who I am, buddy?" And then told him. That is one time where referencing your martial arts training is definitely going to make someone back down. But how many of us are in that situation where our names might be recognized? None, I would imagine.
     
  14. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    I seriously doubt that is the case in the UK.
     
    steve didino likes this.
  15. shyquille graves

    shyquille graves Warrior Monk

    i wouldnt doubt it most of our laws in the states are based off the law from over there and i know there are a few states they you have to try to inform a attacker that you are trained so i wouldnt doubt the fact that they have law like that over there
     
    Papajay likes this.
  16. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    I am an attorney and, while I admittedly do not practice criminal law nor do I know every state's penal code, I have never heard of such a thing being true nor was anything of that nature ever discussed when I took Criminal Law in law school. Sounds like an urban legend to me.
     
    Judah, RJ Clark and SifuPhil like this.
  17. steve didino

    steve didino Disciple

    lol run away it is safer or use baseball bat nuff said
     
  18. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    BTW, the English Common Law of self-defense, which is the basis for the laws of self defense in 49 of the 50 states of the United States (Louisiana being the one exception due to its French roots uses the Napoleonic code) permits "reasonable force" to be used in self-defense based on the circumstances. If someone attacks you, you don't have to declare yourself to be trained in martial arts to use it in self-defense, but the manner in which you use it has to be reasonable given the circumstances and the threat you are actually facing. If someone grabs my shirt in a bar in a threatening manned trying to start a fight with me, it probably isn't reasonable for me to ram my thumb into his eye. On the other hand, putting him in a wrist-lock without telling him that I am trained would almost certainly be considered reasonable.

    If you are an ATTACKER, certainly there are circumstances under which you might be charged with assault with a deadly weapon (I know this has occurred before in situations where a professional boxer has attacked someone in a bar), but if the same boxer were defending himself against an attack, assuming he used reasonable force in defense, he hasn't committed any crime.

    Now, unless there are a lot of witnesses or a video camera or something, the cops will be in a he-said, she-said situation. Thus, it isn't a good idea to do injury to your opponent that makes it look like you are the aggressor or went well beyond reasonable self defense. A good example of this is the use of the arm-bar in self defense situations. Breaking someone's arm just doesn't look good. This is why (among other reasons) I don't think highly of arm-bars for a run-of-the-mill street fight situation. I much prefer blood chokes since they leave no marks and do no permanent damage. Your opponent really has nothing to run to the cops with and claim that you are the aggressor or that you exceeded reasonable force in self defense.
     
    arron butler and Papajay like this.
  19. steve didino

    steve didino Disciple

    I Agree with you Endiku you speak sense.
     
    Enkidu likes this.
  20. Papajay

    Papajay Disciple

    Hi Endiku, As i said it was what i was lead to believe was the law, after some internet research i have discovered i was mislead, i feel kinda stupid for falling for a urban legend!!!
     
    arron butler and Enkidu like this.

Share This Page