Why I don't corkscrew.

Discussion in 'Articles' started by Judah, Aug 22, 2012.

  1. Ian White

    Ian White Samurai

    I too was taught to counter pull as the fist goes in the other hand is withdrawn with equal power using the adding the shoujlder rotation to the rest of the body power. My teacher taught us to aim for a point approx 6" behind the target going right through the opposition. At the moment of impact every part of the body goes solid channeling the power into the target.

    By practicing the correct technique in the dojo. you develop power so when you need to hit in a real situation a less than perfect technique still hurts. i notice how in competition the blow is withdrawn at the moment of impact instead of driving through the target.
     
  2. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    Thats what i tend to do as well. in reaction blocking i tend to switch to more linear punches because theyre faster were as in most other situations ill use the twist. only techniques we have that dosent have some sort of twist in it is front kick, crescent kick (although a twist can be added to it) and hook kick
     
  3. Dave76

    Dave76 Deheuol Gwyn Dragon

    I agree,the reason I asked was just that when I was taught the karate style punch, it was to focus on those two knuckles being the exit output, the point at the end of the screw if you will. But when referring to the Wing Chun punch in particular, there is only one type. They have 'bil ji' strikes or finger thrusting, but for closed fist, theres only one. It's ALLWAYS linear and it can only be used at close range. The wrist is always kept straight by having the bottom and back of your fist straight with your arm. They have no hooks, no upper cuts,etc, just one straight linear punch. The attack tradjectory changes via angle, not technique. In this instance the goal is to consistantly hit with the same part of the fist and the reason for that is to ' not compromise' your wrists.
     
  4. Blade Maker

    Blade Maker Master

    That is an excellent question, by corkscrewing the punch the force of the impact is localized to an area with in the circumference of the rotational arc. or in other words the force of impact is localized to the first 1 or 2 knuckles of the hand.

    Additionally by corkscrewing the punch you can bring all the muscles of the forearm to bear instead of just the pronator or just the supinator, tightening the forearm also reinforces the hand and wrist so there is less energy lost thru transference and more put into your target. This is not to say that other punching methods are inferior, just different.
     
  5. MadoreGojuRyu

    MadoreGojuRyu Master

    same here, due to many years of training I strike with only the first two knuckles as the initial impact. of course depending on the location being struck and the angle the strike is thrown could add the third knuckle but not very often.
     
  6. Blade Maker

    Blade Maker Master

    it's the difference between a jab (straight punch) and a cross (corkscrewing punch), they both work well, they both serve different purposes.
     
  7. Colten Wilson

    Colten Wilson Disciple

    true to a point they are most effective at close range but it depends on the persons build im 6'4 and have a 4 foot reach i would say that i could punch a good range. and why we dont have hooks or upper cuts in the system is becouse they leave holes in your defence we use a gate thory spliting the body into 6 gates with hooks they leaves a hole in your middle gate or your ribs uper cuts you leave a hole in your upper gate or your head don't get me wrong they a very good punches but to few no how to use them . and im sure you've all heard the saying the fastes way from point A to point B is a stright line and thats why we only use the liner punches
     
  8. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Linear sets up circular and circular sets up linear. If all you ever use are linear punches, simple head and body movement will leave you open for a world of hurt. I understand your art has a different philosophy, but the bottom line is no matter what strike you throw you will have exploitable openings in your defense. Technically, even if when you're not striking there are holes in your defense as no one has a force-field bubble surrounding them, they're just not as exploitable as when your taking offensive action.
     
  9. Colten Wilson

    Colten Wilson Disciple

    oh i know what i was trying to say is the size of the whole is bigger and the ability to cover those wholes is harder with hooks and upper cuts not imposable just harder. and could you exsplane your thought on linear sets up circular and circular sets up for linear im not sure what you mean
     
  10. Ian White

    Ian White Samurai

    I've worked with several different styles over the years swapping ideas with other teachers having made friends with local instructors, Iknow the thrust punch either front hand or reverse punch can be very effective. But then close in I find Wing Chun style punching very useful and from a local boxing club the hook and uppercut. They all will do the job if youlearn them and practice them. Keep an open mind.
     
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  11. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    The linear strikes set up circular - say a basic jab, cross, uppercut is the combo. Your opponent deals effectively with the linear jab and cross but gets tagged by the uppercut. Or circular sets up linear - jab, overhand, level change to a straight to the solar plexus. By effectively defending one they set themselves up to be hit by the other. It's simplistic yes, you use striking combinations (I only used combos of three as examples) with level, tempo, and range changes along with good head & body movement/footwork to make it happen. But if all you ever use is one type of striking you make it less likely to get the knock-out hit that goes in unchecked (I'm NOT saying you won't get it, just less likely). Because knock-outs aren't always about power, it's the punch that you don't see coming that knocks you out or hurts. That's what combining linear with circular does for you.
     
  12. Colten Wilson

    Colten Wilson Disciple

    im sorry i was not trying to come across as close mined the effectivness of these punches the hook has probley caused more knock outs then any other punch to as part of my training i have been doing boxing and they are very good punches and this is just my personal exspirance with these punches
     
  13. Ian White

    Ian White Samurai

    I was once knocked down by a right hook from another student and was so impressed i went to learn it immediately :):)
     
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  14. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Understand I'm not disparaging what you're doing with your current instructor/s. When you're with them you basically have to follow their lead. But for personal skill development and growth you may want to diversify your striking.
     
  15. Colten Wilson

    Colten Wilson Disciple

    oh i see what you are saying and you are toltly right about knock-outs are not only about power its also about placement
     
  16. Colten Wilson

    Colten Wilson Disciple


    dont get me wrong i dont just limit my self to one punch for all my attacks i try to use plams,elbows and kicks as well as punches i dont trian in a box lol
     
  17. Dave76

    Dave76 Deheuol Gwyn Dragon

    Wing Chun and Choy Le Fut which is a circular based Kung Fu style, were notorious for having a series of all out battles known as the 'Rooftop Fights' during the 50's. Debating;) the superiority of circular vs linear and vice versa. No agreement was ever found:eek: surprise!
     
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  18. Ian White

    Ian White Samurai

    The lesson here I think is to discover what works for you and to develop it to the best you can. Knowing what works in what situation is the key to your success.
     
  19. Enkidu

    Enkidu Destroyer of your martial arts fantasies

    I've never really studied the physics or kineseology of when we turn turn punches over. I know that I was taught to do so in boxing (although it looks nothing like the 180 degree turn from some martial arts, but it is still a form of corkscrewing). If I had to guess the reason for it, it would be that force is better transmitted from that position, but I don't know for certain. I know it certainly feels right when I turn the punch over, but that could just be because I was taught that way. I certainly know that studies have shown that boxers throw the hardest punches of all martial artists. I am sure some of that is from specialization of time, but I don't doubt that it also comes from having the best punching technique for transmitting power and force.
     
  20. Ian White

    Ian White Samurai

    One instructor told me by rotating the punch you added the force of the muscles required to do this to the power generated by the rest of your body. Another theory its like the difference between a nail and a screw .THe rotation penetrate more
    It seems logical for both theories but personally not sure.
     

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